Category Archives: Assessments

Noncognitve Learning Measures

What are noncognitive learning measures and how do they affect student achievement? Continue reading

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Gaming

Games are not just for 40 year olds who live in their mom’s basement. This article from Edutopia helps to bring to light what we can do to create games that are enticing to young people, while meeting curriculum and skills. Continue reading

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To Err is Human…

All of those mistakes have (except for the hairstyles) made me wiser and more informed. In fact, I would guess that many adults I know (and many of you I don’t) would attest that mistakes, actually, make us smarter. Continue reading

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Training for Tradeable Jobs

Seth Godin reminds us, in his blog post, Back to (the Wrong) School, our education system was set up with particular goals in mind (at the time) – to better educate students on how to take direction, so they could be better industrial workers. Continue reading

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New Standardized Testing

Is there ANY standardized testing that is good? Continue reading

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WE ARE ON TO YOU.

And we wonder…Do the people who make decisions for educators, the people who say teachers are overpaid and underworked…have they SEEN the work that many teachers do? Continue reading

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Social Skills and Higher Test Scores

…students who took part in social and emotional learning, or SEL, programs improved in grades and standardized-test scores by 11 percentile points compared with nonparticipating students. That difference, the authors say, was significant—equivalent to moving a student in the middle of the class academically to the top 40 percent of students during the course of the intervention. Continue reading

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